2019 grants started!

We are happy to announce our recent grant applications were approved by FAPESP! These grants should ensure solid funding for the next several years. Soon we will announce available positions!

  • Non-Classical States of Light on Chips: FAPESP Young Researcher Award  – PI Felippe Barbosa
  • Nonlinear nanophotonics circuits: building blocks for optical frequency synthesis, filtering and signal processing : FAPESP Young Researcher Award  2 – PI Gustavo Wiederhecker;
  • Optomechanical Cavities Towards Single Photon Strong Coupling: FAPESP Young Researcher Award 2 – PI Thiago Alegre;

Group picture – May 2019

GSW_6228_small

From left to right:

Newton F., Antônio V., Natalia C.,  Felippe B., Michäel M., Gustavo W., Pierre A., Marvyn I., André P., Cauê M., Caíque R., Ana Luisa, Pedro P., André M., Gustavo P., Roberto Z., Rodrigo B., Yovanny V., Carol V., David B., Thiago A.

Great research visit from Prof. Michael Menard!

It was great to host Prof. Michäel Menard for the past few months at Unicamp through his sabbatical leave! Can’t believe three months have already gone and its time for him to go back .  The picture shows that we can’t only leave of  science!

Mario got a job in a Bay area (San Francisco) startup that is running on Stealth mode, congrats!

Check out media highlight from Mario’s Nature Communications paper!

Lais poster upgraded to E-poster at CLEO 2018!

Welcome David!

bellecDavid Bellec, an undergraduate student from L’Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Ingénieurs de Caen (ENSICAEN) in France, joined us for an internship. He will be working together with Marvyn, Lais, and Louise to improve our group velocity dispersion measurement setup.

Fourier transform spectrometer on silicon with thermo-optic non-linearity and dispersion correction

Congratulations to Mario! In a recent collaboration between prof. Newton Frateschi and Mario Souza with prof. Yeshaiahu Fainman from UCSD our team has published a new design for a fourier transform spectrometer.

Media Highlights:

Espectrômetro de infravermelho que cabe em um chip (Portuguese version)

Infrared spectrometer on a chip (English version) 

Un espectrómetro de infrarrojo que cabe en un chip (Spanish version) 

Check out the full paper at:

Mario C M M Souza, Andrew Grieco, Newton C Frateschi, Yeshaiahu Fainman: Fourier transform spectrometer on silicon with thermo-optic non-linearity and dispersion correction. In: NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 9 , 2018, ISSN: 2041-1723.

Abstract: 

Miniaturized integrated spectrometers will have unprecedented impact on applications ran- ging from unmanned aerial vehicles to mobile phones, and silicon photonics promises to deliver compact, cost-effective devices. Mirroring its ubiquitous free-space counterpart, a silicon photonics-based Fourier transform spectrometer (Si-FTS) can bring broadband operation and fine resolution to the chip scale. Here we present the modeling and experi- mental demonstration of a thermally tuned Si-FTS accounting for dispersion, thermo-optic non-linearity, and thermal expansion. We show how these effects modify the relation between the spectrum and interferogram of a light source and we develop a quantitative correction procedure through calibration with a tunable laser. We retrieve a broadband spectrum (7 THz around 193.4 THz with 0.38-THz resolution consuming 2.5 W per heater) and demonstrate the Si-FTS resilience to fabrication variations—a major advantage for large- scale manufacturing. Providing design flexibility and robustness, the Si-FTS is poised to become a fundamental building block for on-chip spectroscopy.

Rodrigo’s Scientific Reports is out!

Abstract: Photonic crystals use periodic structures to create frequency regions where the optical wave propagation is forbidden, which allows the creation and integration of complex optical functionalities in small footprint devices. Such strategy has also been successfully applied to confine mechanical waves and to explore their interaction with light in the so-called optomechanical cavities. Because of their challenging design, these cavities are traditionally fabricated using dedicated high-resolution electron-beam lithography tools that are inherently slow, limiting this solution to small-scale or research applications. Here we show how to overcome this problem by using a deep-UV photolithography process to fabricate optomechanical crystals in a commercial CMOS foundry. We show that a careful design of the photonic crystals can withstand the limitations of the photolithography process, producing cavities with measured intrinsic optical quality factors as high as Qi = (1.21 ± 0.02) × 10^6 . Optomechanical crystals are also created using phononic crystals to tightly confine the GHz sound waves within the optical cavity, resulting in a measured vacuum optomechanical coupling rate of g0 = 2π × (91 ± 4) kHz. Efficient sideband cooling and amplification are also demonstrated since these cavities are in the resolved sideband regime. Further improvements in the design and fabrication process suggest that commercial foundry-based optomechanical cavities could be used for quantum ground-state cooling.

Check out the full paper at  

Benevides, Rodrigo, Santos, Felipe G. S., Luiz, Gustavo O., Wiederhecker, Gustavo S., Alegre, Thiago P. Mayer: Ultrahigh-Q optomechanical crystal cavities fabricated in a CMOS foundry. In: Scientific Reports, 7 (1), pp. 2491, 2017, ISBN: 2045-2322.

Ultrahigh-Q optomechanical crystal cavities fabricated in a CMOS foundry

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract: Photonic crystals use periodic structures to create frequency regions where the optical wave propagation is forbidden, which allows the creation and integration of complex optical functionalities in small footprint devices. Such strategy has also been successfully applied to confine mechanical waves and to explore their interaction with light in the so-called optomechanical cavities. Because of their challenging design, these cavities are traditionally fabricated using dedicated high-resolution electron-beam lithography tools that are inherently slow, limiting this solution to small-scale or research applications. Here we show how to overcome this problem by using a deep-UV photolithography process to fabricate optomechanical crystals in a commercial CMOS foundry. We show that a careful design of the photonic crystals can withstand the limitations of the photolithography process, producing cavities with measured intrinsic optical quality factors as high as Qi = (1.21 ± 0.02) × 10^6 . Optomechanical crystals are also created using phononic crystals to tightly confine the GHz sound waves within the optical cavity, resulting in a measured vacuum optomechanical coupling rate of g0 = 2π × (91 ± 4) kHz. Efficient sideband cooling and amplification are also demonstrated since these cavities are in the resolved sideband regime. Further improvements in the design and fabrication process suggest that commercial foundry-based optomechanical cavities could be used for quantum ground-state cooling.

Check out the full paper at:

Benevides, Rodrigo, Santos, Felipe G. S., Luiz, Gustavo O., Wiederhecker, Gustavo S., Alegre, Thiago P. Mayer: Ultrahigh-Q optomechanical crystal cavities fabricated in a CMOS foundry. In: Scientific Reports, 7 (1), pp. 2491, 2017, ISBN: 2045-2322.

Brillouin scattering explained

Check out our recent work on Brillouin scattering in coupled silicon microcavities explained by Fapesp!

Dispositivo possibilita explorar espalhamento de luz por vibrações mecânicas  (Portuguese)

Device designed to exploit scattering of light by mechanical vibrations (English)

Espinel, Y. A. V., Santos, F. G. S., Luiz, G. O., Alegre, T. P. Mayer, Wiederhecker, G. S., Brillouin Optomechanics in Coupled Silicon Microcavities., Scientific Reports, 7 , 43423 (2017).